We’ve moved!

The dot-color blog has moved to a new domain at Nanosys. The change is due in part to the success of the blog (we’re seriously amazed to have had over 100,000 visitors since we started, thank you for stopping by!) and because we wanted to consolidate onto a new platform. All the existing content and comments will stay in place here but new posts can be found at http://www.nanosysinc.com/dot-color/

I’ve already moved current email subscribers over to the new system so you shouldn’t miss a beat. If you have any questions, comments or would like to be removed from the distribution list please email me directly at jeff.yurek@nanosysinc.com

Update: some readers have requested an updated RSS link http://nanosys.squarespace.com/dot-color/?format=rss

Thanks for reading!

Jeff

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Google claims new Nexus 7 delivers 30% wider range of colors – what do they mean?

Google announced an updated version of their Nexus 7 tablet this morning. Central to Google’s pitch was the improved display with both more pixels and more color. The device does feature an impressively high resolution, packing 2.3 million pixels into a 7″ form factor. But, I’m more interested in the color performance and, on this point, Google was vague offering only that the display, “has a 30% wider range of colors.”

What do they mean by that?

It depends on their frame of reference- what color space they are using and what color gamut standard they are comparing against. Since Google talked about the accuracy of HD video at their event, let’s assume that they are referring to the HDTV broadcast standard (rec.709) and using the common CIE 1976 (u’ v’) color space.

When I measured last year’s Nexus 7, I found it could only reproduce about 82%* of the colors found in the rec.709 standard. Color reproduction was not accurate and a little bit undersaturated on this device:

Color gamut of Google's Nexus 7 versus the HDTV broadcast standard (rec.709). Plotted in CIE 1976 (u' v').

Color gamut of Google’s previous generation Nexus 7 versus the HDTV broadcast standard (rec.709). Plotted in CIE 1976 (u’ v’).

With just a simple calculation, increasing 82% by 30%, you’d get about 106% coverage of the HDTV broadcast standard. While that’s actually a slightly wider color gamut than the standard, it is not uncommon for device makers to use a wider color gamut in order to guarantee the color spec across all devices with some room for manufacturing tolerances. This means video and web content should be displayed accurately and it could make for a great looking display.

We’ll order and measure one as soon as they are available to verify so stay tuned…

* note: I always measure coverage of broadcast standards, not simply total area since that can be misleading. However, in this case, coverage and area are nearly the same since the Nexus 7’s gamut is smaller than rec.709.